TABLE 3

Bivariate and Multivariate Analyses of Characteristics Significantly Associated With Routine Offering of Rotavirus Vaccine to Eligible Infants Among Family Medicine Physicians (N = 260)

FactorsRisk Ratio (95% Confidence Interval)b
UnadjustedAdjusted
Physician and practice characteristics
    Male (n = 137)1.02 (0.77–1.33)
    Year of graduation0.99 (0.97–1.01)
    Region of practice
        Midwest (n = 86)Reference
        Northeast (n = 46)0.72 (0.47–1.11)
        South (n = 60)0.85 (0.59–1.21)
        West (n = 68)0.83 (0.59–1.18)
    Location of practice
        Rural (n = 81)0.92 (0.66–1.28)
        Suburban (n = 115)Reference
        Urban, inner city (n = 64)1.13 (0.82–1.55)
    Practice type
        Private (n = 207)Reference
        Health maintenance organization/hospital/clinic (n = 53)1.36 (1.02–1.81)
    No. of providers in practicea
        1–3 (n = 85)Reference
        4–6 (n = 78)0.95 (0.63–1.44)
        7–9 (n = 36)1.22 (0.77–1.93)
        ≥10 (n = 59)1.91 (1.37–2.64)
    Participation in VFC program
        Yes (n = 168)Reference
        No (n = 67)0.50 (0.32–0.77)
        Do not know (n = 23)1.10 (0.75–1.63)
    Proportion of patients with private insurance
        <25% (n = 45)1.12 (0.72–1.73)
        25%–49% (n = 53)1.45 (1.00–2.10)
        50%–74% (n = 82)Reference
        ≥75% (n = 67)1.18 (0.81–1.74)
    Proportion of patients insured by Medicaid/SCHIP
        <10% (n = 87)Reference
        10%–24% (n = 74)1.38 (0.94–2.03)
        25%–49% (n = 51)1.71 (1.17–2.50)
        ≥50% (n = 34)1.50 (0.96–2.35)
    Proportion of uninsured patients
        <10% (n = 175)Reference
        ≥10% (n = 72)0.85 (0.61–1.19)
    Proportion of Hispanic patients
        <10% (n = 150)0.88 (0.67–1.16)
        ≥10% (n = 95)Reference
    Proportion of black patients
        <10% (n = 167)1.03 (0.76–1.39)
        ≥10% (n = 77)Reference
Level of confidence in prelicensure surveillance to monitor vaccine safety
    Great/moderate deal of confidence (n = 162)2.38 (1.60–3.53)1.66 (1.10–2.50)
    Little/no confidence (n = 87)ReferenceReference
Level of confidence in postlicensure surveillance to monitor vaccine safety
    Great deal of/moderate confidence (n = 211)2.05 (1.14–3.67)
    Little/no confidence (n = 37)Reference
Barriers to administering new vaccine (definitely/somewhat a barrier)
    Cost/availability0.82 (0.72–0.94)
        Difficulty obtaining adequate vaccine supplies (n = 35)0.65 (0.39–1.08)
        Lack of adequate reimbursement for vaccination (n = 86)0.42 (0.29–0.63)
        Up-front costs for physicians' practice to purchase vaccine (n = 94)0.48 (0.34–0.69)
        Failure of some insurance companies to cover rotavirus vaccination (n = 111)0.50 (0.36–0.69)
    Unwarranted burden0.83 (0.72–0.96)
        Physicians' belief that rotavirus is not severe disease that requires vaccination (n = 85)0.34 (0.22–0.54)
        Time it takes physician to discuss rotavirus vaccine safety with parents (n = 63)0.39 (0.23–0.64)
        General administrative burden of rotavirus vaccine (n = 69)0.34 (0.20–0.56)
        Physicians' concern about adding another vaccine to already overloaded vaccine schedule (n = 125)0.47 (0.34–0.63)
        Complexity of recommendations for timing of rotavirus vaccine doses (n = 100)0.59 (0.42–0.81)
    Safety/parental concerns0.79 (0.71–0.88)
        Physicians' concerns about safety of rotavirus vaccine (n = 126)0.28 (0.20–0.41)
        Parents' reluctance to have child vaccinated because of withdrawal of previous rotavirus vaccine (n = 108)0.38 (0.26–0.54)
        Parents' concerns about vaccine safety in general (n = 130)0.59 (0.44–0.78)
        Parents not thinking that rotavirus vaccine is necessary (n = 126)0.50 (0.37–0.68)
  • SCHIP indicates State Children's Health Insurance Program; VFC, Vaccines for Children.

  • a This variable was missing for 23%; therefore, data were not included in multivariate analyses.

  • b Only significant adjusted risk ratios shown.