TABLE 2.

Characteristics of Regular Health Care Providers for White, Black, and Hispanic Children 4 to 35 Months of Age in the United States in 2000

CharacteristicProportion or Mean (95% CI)P Value
White (N = 718)Black (N = 477)Hispanic (N = 817)
Usual place for medical care, %*<.001
    Private or group practice80 (76–84)68 (63–73)58 (53–62)
    Community health center/public clinic18 (15–22)30 (25–35)41 (36–45)
    Other/ED2 (1–3)2 (1–4)2 (1–3)
Specific well-child care provider, %*<.001
    No specific provider52 (47–56)61 (55–66)63 (59–67)
    Pediatrician36 (32–40)32 (27–38)30 (26–34)
    Family practitioner10 (7–12)3 (1–4)4 (3–6)
    Other3 (1–4)4 (1–7)3 (1–4)
Location of health care provider's practice, %*<.001
    Urban50 (44–56)66 (58–74)76 (70–81)
    Suburban36 (30–42)24 (18–31)18 (13–23)
    Rural/other14 (9–18)10 (4–16)7 (3–10)
Male gender of well-child care provider, %63 (58–69)51 (42–60)56 (49–62).03
Age of well-child care provider, y42 (41–43)41 (40–43)41 (40–43).16
Race/ethnicity of well-child care provider, %<.001
    White82 (58–69)45 (36–54)53 (46–60)
    Black1 (0.2–2)23 (15–32)5 (2–9)
    Hispanic3 (0.6–5)6 (2–9)16 (12–21)
    American Indian3 (0.4–5)4 (0.8–8)3 (0.5–5)
    Asian/Pacific Islander5 (3–7)9 (4–13)13 (9–18)
    Other7 (4–10)13 (7–20)9 (6–13)
Well-child care provider assigned to child, %7 (4–11)14 (8–20)19 (14–24).01
  • Data are from the 2000 NSECH. Numbers of children are the numbers for whom responses were available and applicable. Percentages are weighted to represent US children 4 to 35 months of age.

  • * Total may exceed 100% because of rounding.