Table 6.

Associations Between Children's Consumption of Food Groups and Presence of Television at Meals, Controlling for Covariates and Sociodemographic Factors

Multiple Linear Regression Coefficients (ß; n = 91)
Television
at Meals
Female
Child
Black
Child
Two-Parent
Household
Family
Income
Consumption frequency per d
Fruit−.16.34.12.18−.23*
Vegetable−.16**−.09−.13.06−.07
Red meat.14**−.01.04−.11.01
Pizza and snack.12*−.03−.15.13.05
Soda.15*−.00−.40*−.30.12
Percent of total daily energy§
Fruit−.01*.02*.02.01−.01*
Vegetable−.01**−.00.00−.01*.00
Red meat.02.01.02−.01−.01
Pizza and snack.02*.00−.03.01.00
Soda.01*−.01−.01−.01.01
Fruit, vegetables, and juice−.02***.00.04**.02−.01
All meat#.02*.02.08**−.02−.00
Pizza, snacks, and soda***.03***−.00−.04*.00.00
  • * P ≤ .05;**P ≤ .01;***P ≤ .001. Asterisks refer to significance of multiple linear regression coefficients (ß).

  • Regression equation also adjusted for: parent's NKAN; number of nights per week parents prepared quick and easy suppers that their children would eat without fussing; child's age; mother's education; and mother's work. None of these were significant in any model.

  • The average number of times per day children ate food from that food group.

  • § The average percentage of total daily energy intake contributed by that food group.

  • Percent of total daily energy from fruits, vegetables and juice, and juice drinks.

  • # Percent of total daily energy from red meat, processed meat, chicken, eggs, and fish.

  • ** Percent of daily energy from pizza, salty snacks, and soda.