Table 3.

Association Between Injury Counseling and Related Safety Behaviors of US Children, 19943-a

Subject (Age-targeted)Unweighted Number Who Adopted Safe Behavior/Number Counseled (Weighted %)Unweighted Number Who Adopted Safe Behavior/Number Not Counseled (Weighted %)Log-likelihoodP Value
Smoke detector (≤14 y)146/156 (93.8)1327/1423 (93.7)NS3-e
Ipecac (≤6 y)105/147 (73.4) 197/656 (32.0)<.01
Poison control telephone number (≤6 y)163/210 (79.3) 272/593 (52.6)<.01
Storage of firearms (2–14 y)3-b  17/27 (50.1) 263/358 (77.4)<.02
Bicycle helmet (5–14 y)3-c  66/138 (43.9) 109/568 (19.1)<.01
Car seat/belt (≤14 y)3-d 360/407 (89.0) 912/1132 (78.2)<.01
 Car seat/belt (≤6 y)3-d 246/261 (96.0) 462/526 (86.9)<.01
 Seat belt (7–14 y)3-d 114/146 (79.0) 450/606 (71.2)NS
  • F3-a All responses of “don't know” were counted as “no” for each safety behavior. The number of “don't know” responses were smoke detector (1), ipecac (11), poison control telephone number (2), gun storage (6), bicycle helmet (6), car seat/belt (≤6 y) (3), and seat belt (7–14 y) (9). One respondent refused to answer a question regarding storage of firearms.

  • F3-b Limited to homes with a gun.

  • F3-c Limited to children who had ridden a bicycle in the past 30 days.

  • F3-d Limited to children who had ridden in a car, van, or truck in the past 30 days.

  • F3-e Not statistically significant.