CoSTR Part 10: Worksheet Appendix

Task ForceWS IDPICO TitleShort TitleAuthorsURL
PedsPeds-001AIn infants (<1 year, not including newly born) in cardiac arrest (prehospital [OHCA], in-hospital [IHCA]) (P), does the use of AEDs (I) compared with standard management (which does not include use of AEDs) (C), improve outcomes (eg. termination of rhythm, ROSC, survival) (O)?AEDs in children less than 1 yrReylon A. Meekshttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-001A.pdf
PedsPeds-001BIn infants (<1 year, not including newly born) in cardiac arrest (prehospital [OHCA], in-hospital [IHCA]) (P), does the use of AEDs (I) compared with standard management (which does not include use of AEDs) (C), improve outcomes (eg. termination of rhythm, ROSC, survival) (O)?AEDs in children less than 1 yrAntonio Rodriguez-Nunezhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-001B.pdf
PedsPeds-002AFor infants and children in cardiac arrest, does the use of a pulse check (I) vs. assessment for signs of life (C) improve the accuracy of diagnosis of pediatric CPA (O)?Pulse check accuracyAaron Donoghue, James Tibballshttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-002A.pdf
PedsPeds-003During cardiac arrest in infants or children (P), does the presence of family members during the resuscitation (I) compared to their absence (C) improve patient or family outcome measures (O)?Family presenceDouglas S. Diekemahttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-003.pdf
PedsPeds-004In infants and children with respiratory failure who undergo endotracheal intubation (prehospital [OHCA], in-hospital [IHCA]) (P), does the use of devices (eg. CO2 detection device, CO2 analyzer or esophageal detector device) (I) compared with usual management (C), improve the accuracy of diagnosis of airway placement (O)?Verification of airway placementDiana G. Fendya, Monica Kleinmanhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-004.pdf
PedsPeds-005AIn pediatric patients with cardiac arrest (prehospital [OHCA] or in-hospital [IHCA]) (P), does the use of end-tidal CO2 (I), compared with clinical assessment (C), improve accuracy of diagnosis of a perfusing rhythm (O)?End-tidal CO2 to diagnose perfusing rhythmArno Zaritskyhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-005A.pdf
PedsPeds-005BIn pediatric patients with cardiac arrest (prehospital [OHCA] or in-hospital [IHCA]) (P), does the use of end-tidal CO2 (I), compared with clinical assessment (C), improve accuracy of diagnosis of a perfusing rhythm (O)?End-tidal CO2 to diagnose perfusing rhythmAnne-Marie Guerguerianhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-005B.pdf
PedsPeds-006BIn pediatric patients in clinical cardiac arrest (prehospital [OHCA] or in hospital [IHCA]) (P), does the use of a focused echocardiogram (I) compared with standard assessment, assist in the diagnosis of reversible causes of cardiac arrest?Methods to diagnose perfusing rhythmChristoph B. Eich, Faiqa A. Qureshihttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-006B.pdf
PedsPeds-007In children requiring emergent intubation (prehospital, in-hospital) (P), does the use of cuffed ETTs (I) compared with uncuffed ETTs (C) improve therapeutic endpoints (eg, oxygenation and ventilation) or reduce morbidity or risk of complications (eg, need for tube change, airway injury, aspiration) (O)?Cuffed vs uncuffed ETTsAshraf Coovadiahttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-007.pdf
PedsPeds-008In children requiring assisted ventilation (prehospital, in-hospital) (P), does the use of bag-valve-mask (I) compared with endotracheal intubation (C) improve therapeutic endpoints (oxygenation and ventilation), reduce morbidity or risk of complications (eg, aspiration), or improve survival (O)?BVM vs intubationDominique Biarenthttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-008.pdf
PedsPeds-009In pediatric patients in cardiac arrest (prehospital [OHCA] or in-hospital [IHCA]) (P), does the use of supraglottic airway devices (I) compared with bag-valve-mask alone (C), improve therapeutic endpoints (eg, ventilation and oxygenation), improve quality of resuscitation (eg, reduce hands-off time, allow for continuous compressions), reduce morbidity or risk of complications (eg, aspiration) or improve survival (O)?Supraglottic airway devicesRobert Binghamhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-009.pdf
PedsPeds-010AFor infants and children who have ROSC after cardiac arrest (P), does the use of induced hypothermia (I) compared with normothermia (C) improve outcome (survival to discharge, survival with good neurologic outcome) (O)?Induced hypothermia after ROSCRobert Hickeyhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-010A.pdf
PedsPeds-010BFor infants and children who have ROSC after cardiac arrest (P), does the use of induced hypothermia (I) compared with normothermia (C) improve outcome (survival to discharge, survival with good neurologic outcome) (O)?Induced hypothermia after ROSCJames S. Hutchisonhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-010B.pdf
PedsPeds-011BIn infants and children with cardiac arrest from a non-asphyxial or asphyxial cause (excluding newborns) (prehospital [OHCA] or in-hospital [IHCA]) (P), does the use of another specific C:V ratio by laypersons and HCPs (I) compared with standard care (15:2) (C), improve outcome (eg, ROSC, survival) (O)?Compression ventilation ratioRobert Bingham, Robert Hickeyhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-011B.pdf
PedsPeds-012AIn infants and children (not including newborns) with cardiac arrest (out-of-hospital and in-hospital) (P), does the use of compression-only CPR (I) as opposed to standard CPR (ventilations and compressions) (C), improve outcome (O) (eg, ROSC, survival)?Compression only CPRRobert A. Berg, Dominique Biarenthttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-012A.pdf
PedsPeds-013AIn pediatric patients with cardiac arrest (prehospital [OHCA] or in-hospital [IHCA]) and a secure airway (P), does the use of a specific minute ventilation (combination of respiratory rate and tidal volume) depending on the etiology of the arrest (I) as opposed to standard care (8–10 asynchronous breaths per minute) (C), improve outcome (O) (eg. ROSC, survival)?Etiology specific minute ventilationMonica Kleinmanhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-013A.pdf
PedsPeds-013BIn pediatric patients with cardiac arrest (prehospital [OHCA] or in-hospital [IHCA]) and a secure airway (P), does the use of a specific minute ventilation (combination of respiratory rate and tidal volume) depending on the etiology of the arrest (I) as opposed to standard care (8–10 asynchronous breaths per minute) (C), improve outcome (O) (eg. ROSC, survival)?Etiology specific minute ventilationNaoki Shimizuhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-013A.pdf
PedsPeds-014In pediatric patients in cardiac arrest (prehospital [OHCA] or in-hospital [IHCA]) (P) does the use of rapid deployment ECMO or emergency cardiopulmonary bypass (I), compared with standard treatment (C), improve outcome (ROSC, survival to hospital discharge, survival with favorable neurologic outcomes) (O)?”ECMOMarilyn Morrishttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-014.pdf
PedsPeds-014BIn pediatric patients in cardiac arrest (prehospital [OHCA] or in-hospital [IHCA]) (P) does the use of rapid deployment ECMO or emergency cardiopulmonary bypass (I), compared with standard treatment (C), improve outcome (ROSC, survival to hospital discharge, survival with favorable neurologic outcomes) (O)?ECMOKate L. Brownhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-014B.pdf
PedsPeds-015In pediatric patients in cardiac arrest, associated with or without asphyxia (prehospital [OHCA] or in-hospital [IHCA]) (P) does ventilation with a specific oxygen concentration (room air or a titrated concentration between 0.21 and 1.0) (I), compared with standard treatment (100% oxygen) (C), improve outcome (ROSC, survival to hospital discharge, survival with favorable neurologic outcome) (O)?Titrated oxygen vs 100% oxygenRobert Hickeyhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-015.pdf
PedsPeds-016In infants and children with ROSC after cardiac arrest (prehospital or in-hospital) (P), does the use of a specific strategy to manage blood glucose (eg. target range) (I) as opposed to standard care (C), improve outcome (O) (eg. survival)?Glucose control following resuscitationDuncan Macrae, Vijay Srinivasanhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-016.pdf
PedsPeds-017BIn pediatric patients with cardiac arrest (pre-hospital [OHCA] or in-hospital [IHCA]) (P), does the use of any specific alternative method for calculating drug dosages (I) compared with standard weight-based dosing (C), improve outcome (eg, achieving expected drug effect, ROSC, survival, avoidance of toxicity) (O)?Methods for calculating drug dosagesIan Maconochie, Vijay Srinivasanhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-017B.pdf
PedsPeds-018In adult and pediatric patients with cardiac arrest (pre-hospital [OHCA] or in-hospital [IHCA) (P), does the use of any specific alternative dosing regimen for epinephrine (I) compared with standard recommendations (C), improve outcome (eg. ROSC, survival to hospital discharge, survival with favorable neurologic outcome) (O)?Epinephrine doseAmelia Reishttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-018.pdf
PedsPeds-019In pediatric patients with cardiac arrest (pre-hospital [OHCA] or in-hospital [IHCA]) due to VF/pulseless VT (P), does the use of amiodarone (I) compared with lidocaine (C), improve outcome (eg, ROSC, survival to hospital discharge, survival with favorable neurologic outcome) (O)?Amiodarone vs lidocaine for VF/VTDianne L. Atkinshttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-019.pdf
PedsPeds-020AIn adult and pediatric patients with cardiac arrest (pre-hospital [OHCA] or in-hospital [IHCA]) (P), does the use of vasopressin or vasopressin + epinephrine (I) compared with standard treatment recommendations (C), improve outcome (eg, ROSC, survival to hospital discharge, or survival with favorable neurologic outcome) (O)?VasopressinElise W. van der Jagthttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-020A.pdf
PedsPeds-020BIn adult and pediatric patients with cardiac arrest (pre-hospital [OHCA] or in-hospital [IHCA]) (P), does the use of vasopressin or vasopressin + epinephrine (I) compared with standard treatment recommendations (C), improve outcome (eg, ROSC, survival to hospital discharge, or survival with favorable neurologic outcome) (O)?VasopressinDominique Biarenthttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-020B.pdf
PedsPeds-021AIn pediatric patients with cardiac arrest (pre-hospital [OHCA] or in-hospital [IHCA]) (P), does the use of calcium (I) compared with no calcium (C), improve outcome (O) (eg. ROSC, survival to hospital discharge, survival with favorable neurologic outcome)?CalciumAllan de Caenhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-021A.pdf
PedsPeds-021BIn pediatric patients with cardiac arrest (pre-hospital [OHCA] or in-hospital [IHCA]) (P), does the use of calcium (I) compared with no calcium (C), improve outcome (O) (eg. ROSC, survival to hospital discharge, survival with favorable neurologic outcome)?CalciumFelipe Martinez, Sergio Pesutic, Sergio Rendichhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-021B.pdf
PedsPeds-022AIn pediatric patients with cardiac arrest due to primary or secondary VF or pulseless VT (pre-hospital [OHCA] or in-hospital [IHCA]) (P), does the use of more than one shock for the initial or subsequent defibrillation attempt(s) (I), compared with standard management (C), improve outcome (eg. termination of rhythm, ROSC, survival to hospital discharge, survival with favorable neurologic outcome) (O)?Single or stacked shocksMarc Berghttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-022A.pdf
PedsPeds-023AIn pediatric patients with cardiac arrest due to primary or secondary VF or pulseless VT (pre-hospital [OHCA] or in-hospital [IHCA]) (P), does the use of a specific energy dose or regimen of energy doses for the initial or subsequent defibrillation attempt(s) (I), compared with standard management (C), improve outcome (eg. termination of rhythm, ROSC, survival to hospital discharge, survival with favorable neurologic outcome) (O)?Energy dosesJonathan R. Eganhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-023A.pdf
PedsPeds-023BIn pediatric patients with cardiac arrest due to primary or secondary VF or pulseless VT (pre-hospital [OHCA] or in-hospital [IHCA]) (P), does the use of a specific energy dose or regimen of energy doses for the initial or subsequent defibrillation attempt(s) (I), compared with standard management (C), improve outcome (eg. termination of rhythm, ROSC, survival to hospital discharge, survival with favorable neurologic outcome) (O)?Energy dosesDianne L. Atkinshttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-023B.pdf
PedsPeds-024AIn pediatric patients with ROSC after cardiac arrest (pre-hospital [OHCA] or in-hospital [IHCA]) who have signs of cardiovascular dysfunction (P), does the use of any specific cardioactive drugs (I) as opposed to standard care (or different cardioactive drugs) (C), improve physiologic endpoints (oxygen delivery, hemodynamics) or patient outcome (eg, survival to discharge or survival with favorable neurologic outcome) (O)?Cardioactive drugs post resuscitationAllan de Caenhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-024A.pdf
PedsPeds-024BIn pediatric patients with ROSC after cardiac arrest (pre-hospital [OHCA] or in-hospital [IHCA]) who have signs of cardiovascular dysfunction (P), does the use of any specific cardioactive drugs (I) as opposed to standard care (or different cardioactive drugs) (C), improve physiologic endpoints (oxygen delivery, hemodynamics) or patient outcome (eg, survival to discharge or survival with favorable neurologic outcome) (O)?Cardioactive drugs post resuscitationMark G. Coulthardhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-024B.pdf
PedsPeds-025AIn pediatric patients with in-hospital cardiac or respiratory arrest (P), does use of EWSS/response teams/MET systems (I) compared with no such responses (C), improve outcome (eg, reduce rate of cardiac and respiratory arrests and in-hospital mortality) (O)?METsElise W. van der Jagthttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-025A.pdf
PedsPeds-025BIn pediatric patients with in-hospital cardiac or respiratory arrest (P), does use of EWSS/response teams/MET systems (I) compared with no such responses (C), improve outcome (eg, reduce rate of cardiac and respiratory arrests and in-hospital mortality) (O)?METsJames Tibballshttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-025B.pdf
PedsPeds-026AFor intubated newborns within the first month of life (beyond the delivery room) who are receiving chest compressions (P), does the use of continuous chest compressions (without pause for ventilation) (I) vs. chest compressions with interruptions for ventilation (C) improve outcome (time to sustained heart rate >100, survival to ICU admission, survival to discharge, survival with favorable neurologic status) (O)?Continuous chest compressions for intubated newborns outside of DRMonica Kleinmanhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-026A.pdf
PedsPeds-027AFor newborns within the first month of life (beyond the delivery room) who are not intubated and who are receiving CPR (P), does the use of a 3:1 compression to ventilation ratio (I), compared with a 15:2 compression to ventilation ratio (C) improve outcome (time to sustained heart rate >100, survival to ICU admission, survival to discharge, discharge with favorable neurologic status) (O)?3:1 vs 15:2 ratio for neonates outside of DRLeon Chameideshttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-027A.pdf
PedsPeds-028In pediatric patients with cardiac arrest (out-of-hospital and in-hospital) (including prolonged arrest states) (P), does the use of NaHCO3 (I) compared with no NaHCO3 (C), improve outcome (O) (eg. ROSC, survival)?Sodium bicarbonateStephen M. Schexnayderhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-028.pdf
PedsPeds-029In infants and children in cardiac arrest (prehospital [OHCA], in-hospital [IHCA]) (P), does the use of any specific paddle/pad size/orientation and position (I) compared with standard resuscitation or other specific paddle/pad size/orientation and position) (C), improve outcomes (eg. successful defibrillation, ROSC, survival) (O)?Paddle size and placement for defibrillationDianne L. Atkinshttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-029.pdf
PedsPeds-030In infants and children with unstable ventricular tachycardia (pre-hospital and in-hospital) (P), does the use of any drug/ combination of drugs/ intervention (eg. cardioversion) (I) compared with no drugs/intervention (C) improve outcome (eg, termination of rhythm, survival) (O)?Unstable VTJeffrey M. Berman, Bradford D. Harrishttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-030.pdf
PedsPeds-031In infants and children with supraventricular tachycardia with a pulse (P), does the use of any drug or combination of drugs (I), compared with adenosine (C), result in improved outcomes (termination of rhythm, survival)?Drugs for SVTRicardo A. Samsonhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-031.pdf
PedsPeds-032In infants and children with hemorrhagic shock following trauma (P), does the use of graded volume resuscitation (I) as opposed to standard care (C), improve outcome (hemodynamics, survival) (O)?Graded volume resuscitation for traumatic shockJesús Lopez-Hercehttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-032.pdf
PedsPeds-033In pediatric patients in cardiac arrest (prehospital [OHCA], in-hospital [IHCA]) (P), does the use of one hand chest compressions (I) compared with two hand chest compressions (C) improve outcomes (eg. ROSC, rescuer performance) (O)?One hand vs two hand compressionsSharon B. Kinneyhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-033.pdf
PedsPeds-034In infants with cardiac arrest (prehospital [OHCA], in-hospital [IHCA]) (P), does the use of two-thumb chest compression without circumferential squeeze (I) compared to two-thumb chest compression with circumferential squeeze (C) improve outcome (eg. ROSC, rescuer performance (O)?Circumferential squeeze for infant CPRJames Tibballshttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-034.pdf
PedsPeds-035In infants and children with cardiac arrest (P), does establishing intraosseous access (I) compared to establishing conventional (non-intraosseous) venous access (C) improve patient outcome (eg. ROSC, survival to hospital discharge (O)?IO vs IVJonathan Duffhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-035.pdf
PedsPeds-036In infants and children with cardiac arrest (P), does the use of tracheal drug delivery (I) compared to intravenous drug delivery (C) worsen patient outcome (eg. ROSC, survival to hospital discharge (O)?ET vs IV drugsMioara D. Manolehttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-036.pdf
PedsPeds-038BIn infants and children in shock, does early intubation and assisted ventilation compared to the use of these interventions only for associated respiratory failure lead to improved patient outcome (hemodynamics, survival?)Intubation for shock (timing)Amelia Reishttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-038B.pdf
PedsPeds-039AIn infants and children with respiratory failure who require emergent endotracheal intubation (P), does the use of cricoid pressure or laryngeal manipulation (I), when compared with standard practice (C), improve or worsen outcome (eg. success of intubation, aspiration risk, side effects, etc) (O )?Cricoid pressure and laryngeal manipulationLester T. Proctorhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-039A.pdf
PedsPeds-039BIn infants and children with respiratory failure who require emergent endotracheal intubation (P), does the use of cricoid pressure or laryngeal manipulation (I), when compared with standard practice (C), improve or worsen outcome (eg. success of intubation, aspiration risk, side effects, etc) (O )?Cricoid pressure and laryngeal manipulationIan Maconochiehttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-039B.pdf
PedsPeds-040AIn infants and children in cardiac arrest (out-of-hospital and in-hospital) (P), does any specific compression depth (I) as opposed to standard care (ie. depth specified in treatment algorithm) (C), improve outcome (O) (eg. Blood pressure, ROSC, survival)?Compression depthRobert M. Suttonhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-040A.pdf
PedsPeds-040BIn infants and children in cardiac arrest (out-of-hospital and in-hospital) (P), does any specific compression depth (I) as opposed to standard care (ie. depth specified in treatment algorithm) (C), improve outcome (O) (eg. Blood pressure, ROSC, survival)?Compression depthDavid Zidemanhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-040B.pdf
PedsPeds-041AIn children and infants with cardiac arrest due to major (blunt or penetrating) injury (out-of-hospital and in-hospital) (P), does the use of any specific modifications to standard resuscitation (I) compared with standard resuscitation (C), improve outcome (O) (eg. ROSC, survival)? eg. open vs closed chest CPR, other examples.Traumatic arrestKennith Sartorellihttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-041A.pdf
PedsPeds-041BIn children and infants with cardiac arrest due to major (blunt or penetrating) injury (out-of-hospital and in-hospital) (P), does the use of any specific modifications to standard resuscitation (I) compared with standard resuscitation (C), improve outcome (O) (eg. ROSC, survival)? eg. open vs closed chest CPR, other examples.Traumatic arrestJesús Lopez-Hercehttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-041B.pdf
PedsPeds-043AIn infants and children in cardiac arrest (prehospital [OHCA], in-hospital [IHCA]) (P), does the use of self-adhesive defibrillation pads (I) compared with paddles (C), improve outcomes (eg. successful defibrillation, ROSC, survival) (O)?Hands off defibrillation vs paddlesMark Terryhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-043A.pdf
PedsPeds-043BIn infants and children in cardiac arrest (prehospital [OHCA], in-hospital [IHCA]) (P), does the use of self-adhesive defibrillation pads (I) compared with paddles (C), improve outcomes (eg. successful defibrillation, ROSC, survival) (O)?Hands off defibrillation vs paddlesFarhan Bhanjihttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-043B.pdf
PedsPeds-044AIn infants and children with any type of shock (P), does the use of any specific resuscitation fluid or combination of fluids [eg: isotonic crystalloid, colloid, hypertonic saline, blood products] (I) when compared with standard care (C) improve patient outcome (hemodynamics, survival) (O)?Resuscitation fluidsSharon E. Macehttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-044A.pdf
PedsPeds-044BIn infants and children with any type of shock (P), does the use of any specific resuscitation fluid or combination of fluids [eg: isotonic crystalloid, colloid, hypertonic saline, blood products] (I) when compared with standard care (C) improve patient outcome (hemodynamics, survival) (O)?Resuscitation fluidsRichard P. Aickinhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-044B.pdf
PedsPeds-045AIn infants and children with distributive shock with and without myocardial dysfunction (P), does the use of any specific inotropic agent (I) when compared to standard care (C), improve patient outcome (hemodynamics, survival) (O)?Distributive shock and inotropesEricka L. Fink, Alfredo Misrajihttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-045A.pdf
PedsPeds-045BIn infants and children with distributive shock with and without myocardial dysfunction (P), does the use of any specific inotropic agent (I) when compared to standard care (C), improve patient outcome (hemodynamics, survival) (O)?Distributive shock and inotropesLoh Tsee Foonghttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-045B.pdf
PedsPeds-046AIn infants and children with cardiogenic shock (P), does the use of any specific inotropic agent (I) when compared with standard care (C), improve patient outcome (hemodynamics, survival) (O)?Cardiogenic shock and inotropesAkira Nishisakihttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-046A.pdf
PedsPeds-047AIn infants and children with hypotensive septic shock (P), does the use of etomidate as an induction agent to facilitate intubation (I) compared with a standard technique without etomidate (C) improve patient outcome (hemodynamics, survival) (O)?Etomidate and septic shockStephen M. Schexnayderhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-047A.pdf
PedsPeds-047BIn infants and children with hypotensive septic shock (P), does the use of etomidate as an induction agent to facilitate intubation (I) compared with a standard technique without etomidate (C) improve patient outcome (hemodynamics, survival) (O)?Etomidate and septic shockJonathan Duffhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-047B.pdf
PedsPeds-048AIn infants and children who are undergoing resuscitation from cardiac arrest (P), does consideration of a channelopathy as the etiology of the arrest (I), as compared with standard management (C), improve outcome (ROSC, survival to discharge, survival with favorable neurologic outcome) (O)?ChannelopathiesRobert Hickeyhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-048A.pdf
PedsPeds-048BIn infants and children who are undergoing resuscitation from cardiac arrest (P), does consideration of a channelopathy as the etiology of the arrest (I), as compared with standard management (C), improve outcome (ROSC, survival to discharge, survival with favorable neurologic outcome) (O)?ChannelopathiesWilliam Scotthttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-048B.pdf
PedsPeds-049AIn infants and children with hypotensive septic shock (P), does the use of corticosteroids in addition to standard care (I) when compare with standard care without the use of corticosteroids (C), improve patient outcome (eg. Hemodynamics or survival) (O)?Corticosteroids and septic shockArno Zaritskyhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-049A.pdf
PedsPeds-049BIn infants and children with hypotensive septic shock (P), does the use of corticosteroids in addition to standard care (I) when compare with standard care without the use of corticosteroids (C), improve patient outcome (eg. Hemodynamics or survival) (O)?Corticosteroids and septic shockMark G. Coulthardhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-049B.pdf
PedsPeds-050AIn infants and children with acute illness or injury (P), do specific diagnostic tests (laboratory data [mixed venous oxygen saturation, pH, lactate], (I) as opposed to clinical data (vital signs, capillary refill, mental status, end-organ function [urine output]) (C), increase the accuracy of diagnosis of shock (O)?Diagnostic tests for shockAlexis Topjianhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-050A.pdf
PedsPeds-050BIn infants and children with acute illness or injury (P), do specific diagnostic tests (laboratory data [mixed venous oxygen saturation, pH, lactate], (I) as opposed to clinical data (vital signs, capillary refill, mental status, end-organ function [urine output]) (C), increase the accuracy of diagnosis of shock (O)?Diagnostic tests for shockSharon B. Kinneyhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-050B.pdf
PedsPeds-052AIn infants and children with cardiac arrest or symptomatic bradycardia that is unresponsive to oxygenation and/or ventilation (P), does the use of atropine (I), as compared with epinephrine or no atropine (C), improve patient outcome (return to age-appropriate heart rate, subsequent pulseless arrest, ROSC, survival) (O)?Atropine vs epinephrine for bradycardiaSusan Fuchs, Sasa Kurosawa, Masahiko Nittahttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-052A.pdf
PedsPeds-055BFor infants and children with Fontan or hemi-Fontan circulation who require resuscitation from cardiac arrest or pre-arrest states (prehospital [OHCA] or in-hospital [IHCA]) (P), does any specific modification to standard practice (I) compared with standard resuscitation practice (C) improve outcome (eg. ROSC, survival to discharge, survival with good neurologic outcome (O)?Resuscitation for hemi-Fontan/Fontan circulationDesmond Bohn, Bradley S. Marinohttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-055B.pdf
PedsPeds-056AFor infants and children in cardiac arrest with pulmonary hypertension (prehospital [OHCA] or in-hospital [IHCA]) (P), do any specific modifications to resuscitation techniques (I) compared with standard resuscitation techniques (C), improve outcome (ROSC, survival to discharge, favorable neurologic survival) (O)?Resuscitation of the patient with pulmonary hypertensionIan Adatia, John Berger, David Wesselhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-056A.pdf
PedsPeds-057AFor infants and children who require endotracheal intubation (prehospital or in hospital) (P) does the use of a specific formula to guide cuffed endotracheal tube size (I), as opposed to the use of the existing formula of 3 + age/4 (C), achieve better outcomes (eg. successful tube placement) (O)?Formula for cuffed ET tube sizeRobert Binghamhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-057A.pdf
PedsPeds-057BFor infants and children who require endotracheal intubation (prehospital or in hospital) (P) does the use of a specific formula to guide cuffed endotracheal tube size (I), as opposed to the use of the existing formula of 3 + age/4 (C), achieve better outcomes (eg. successful tube placement) (O)?Formulas for predicting ET tube sizeEugene B. Freidhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-057B.pdf
PedsPeds-059For infants and children with single ventricle, s/p stage I repair who require resuscitation from cardiac arrest or pre-arrest states (prehospital [OHCA] or in-hospital [IHCA]) (P), does any specific modification to standard practice (I) compared with standard resuscitation practice (C) improve outcome (eg. ROSC, survival to discharge, survival with good neurologic outcome) (O)?Resuscitation of the patient with single ventricleGeorge M. Hoffman, Shane Tibbyhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-059.pdf
PedsPeds-060For pediatric patients (in any setting (P), is there a clinical decision rule (I) that enables reliable prediction of ROSC (or futile resuscitation efforts)? (PROGNOSIS)Clinical decision rules to predict ROSCGabrielle Nuthallhttp://circ.ahajournals.org/site/C2010/Peds-060.pdf