TABLE 3

Physical Examination Features To Be Considered in the Evaluation of a Potential BRUE

Physical Examination
General appearance
 Craniofacial abnormalities (mandible, maxilla, nasal)
 Age-appropriate responsiveness to environment
Growth variables
 Length, weight, occipitofrontal circumference
Vital signs
 Temperature, pulse, respiratory rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation
Skin
 Color, perfusion, evidence of injury (eg, bruising or erythema)
Head
 Shape, fontanelles, bruising or other injury
Eyes
 General, extraocular movement, pupillary response
 Conjunctival hemorrhage
 Retinal examination, if indicated by other findings
Ears
 Tympanic membranes
Nose and mouth
 Congestion/coryza
 Blood in nares or oropharynx
 Evidence of trauma or obstruction
 Torn frenulum
Neck
 Mobility
Chest
 Auscultation, palpation for rib tenderness, crepitus, irregularities
Heart
 Rhythm, rate, auscultation
Abdomen
 Organomegaly, masses, distention
 Tenderness
Genitalia
 Any abnormalities
Extremities
 Muscle tone, injuries, limb deformities consistent with fracture
Neurologic
 Alertness, responsiveness
 Response to sound and visual stimuli
 General tone
 Pupillary constriction in response to light
 Presence of symmetrical reflexes
 Symmetry of movement/tone/strength