TABLE 2

Oral Vitamin D Preparations Currently Available in the United States (in Alphabetical Order)

PreparationaDosage
Bio-D-Mulsion (Biotics Research Laboratory, Rosenberg, TX; www.bioticsresearch.com)1 drop contains 400 IUb; also comes in a preparation of 2000 IU per dropb; corn oil preparation
Carlson Laboratories (Arlington Heights, IL; www.carlsonlabs.com)1 gel cap contains 400 IU; also comes in 2000-IU and 4000-IU gel caps and in single-drop preparations of 400-IU, 1000-IU, and 2000-IUb; safflower oil preparation
Just D (Sunlight Vitamins Inc [Distributed by UnitDrugCo, Centennial, CO]; www.sunlightvitamins.com)1 mL contains 400 IU; corn oil preparation
Multivitamin preparations: polyvitamins (A, D, and C vitamin preparations)c1 mL contains 400 IU; variable preparations that include glycerin and water; may also contain propylene glycol and/or polysorbate 80
  • Note that higher-dose oral preparations may be necessary for the treatment of those with rickets in the first few months of therapy or for patients with chronic diseases such as fat malabsorption (cystic fibrosis) or patients chronically taking medications that interfere with vitamin D metabolism (such as antiseizure medications).

  • a A study by Martinez et al162 showed that newborn and older infants preferred oil-based liquid preparations to alcohol-based preparations.

  • b Single-drop preparation may be better tolerated in patients with oral aversion issues, but proper instruction regarding administration of these drops must be given to the parents or care provider, given the increased risk of toxicity, incorrect dosing, or accidental ingestion.

  • c The cost of vitamin D–only preparations may be more than multivitamin preparations and could be an issue for health clinics that dispense vitamins to infants and children. The multivitamin preparation was the only preparation available until recently; therefore, there is a comfort among practitioners in dispensing multivitamins to all age groups.