TABLE 2

Factors Associated With Broad-Spectrum Antibiotic Prescribing for OM in Children ≤14 y Old

FactorProportion (95% CI) of Broad-Spectruma Antibiotics, at Visits With Antibiotics PrescribedAdjusted OR for Broad-Spectrum Prescribing (95% CI)
Age, y
 0–454% (50%–59%)1.00
 5–1442% (35%–49%)0.63 (0.45–0.89)
Gender
 Male52% (47%–57%)1.00
 Female50% (45%–55%)0.87 (0.68–1.11)
Race
 Nonblack52% (48%–57%)1.00
 Black42% (35%–49%)0.59 (0.40–0.86)
Region
 Northeast48% (39%–58%)1.00
 Midwest45% (39%–52%)0.84 (0.51–1.36)
 South60% (53%–66%)1.67 (1.03–2.71)
 West42% (35%–49%)0.73 (0.43–1.24)
Insurance
 Private57% (52%–62%)1.00
 Public47% (42%–52%)0.79 (0.57–1.07)
 Self-pay or other35% (24%–48%)0.50 (0.28–0.89)
Setting
 Office54% (49%–59%)1.00
 Hospital outpatient department45% (38%–51%)0.83 (0.60–1.16)
 Emergency department37% (34%–40%)0.55 (0.43–0.71)
Specialtyb
 Nonpediatric specialty44% (35%–54%)1.00
 Pediatrics56% (50%–62%)1.42 (0.88–2.29)
Metropolitan statistical area
 Nonmetropolitan47% (38%–55%)1.00
 Metropolitan52% (47%–56%)1.17 (0.77–1.77)
Year
 200856% (48%–63%)1.00
 200950% (43%–59%)0.88 (0.58–1.33)
 201047% (41%–53%)0.75 (0.50–1.12)
  • a Percentages reflect the proportion of antibiotics that were broad-spectrum agents. Broad-spectrum antibiotics included macrolides, quinolones, broad-spectrum penicillins (including β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor combinations), clindamycin, and broad-spectrum (second- to fourth-generation) cephalosporins.

  • b Data on physician specialty are for offices only. Thus, the odds ratio for specialty is from a separate model that included data from visits to offices only.